Berry College Featured in Princeton Review book “The Best 384 Colleges”
Friday, August 10, 2018- 3:32 p.m. 
PRESS RELEASE 
 
Berry College is featured in the new 2019 edition of the Princeton Review book, “The Best 384 Colleges.”
 
Berry is one of the nation's best institutions for undergraduate education, according to The Princeton Review. Only about 15% of America’s 2,500 four-year colleges and two colleges outside the U.S. are profiled in the book, which is one of The Princeton Review's most popular guides.
 
"We picked the 384 'best' colleges for our book primarily for their outstanding academics; we highly recommend each one," said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review's Editor-in-Chief and the book's lead author.
 
Students describe Berry as “a rigorous liberal arts school that offers undergraduates a community in which they can easily flourish.” When it comes to academics, classroom standards are “high” though “not impossible” to meet. Of course, the college has many “renowned programs” including “business, animal science and nursing.” Undergraduates also happily share that most professors at Berry “are invested in their students and care about their success.” They are also “highly knowledgeable about their subjects and are able to convey that knowledge to their students.”
 
All in all, students find Berry to be a “community that is committed to developing the minds, hearts, and hands of students through impeccable faculty with a passion for learning...[and] incredible...programs [that provide] students [with] hands on experience in almost any area of study.”
 
Berry’s majestic campus, the world’s largest with 27,000 acres, was ranked seventh for “most beautiful.”  It also ranked 17th for students “most engaged in community service.” All of the ranking lists are based on The Princeton Review's surveys of students who attend the colleges.
 
Berry President Steve Briggs said, “Being included on the Princeton Review’s list of the Best 384 Colleges affirms what we have known for a long time:  Berry unites challenging academic programs with opportunities for practical, firsthand experiences in a way that rivals the best colleges in the country.  Our priority is the success and character of our students, and our approach builds competence and confidence as students prepare for fulfilling lives and meaningful careers.   We are delighted for Princeton Review to shine its bright spotlight on our programs.”
 
In its profile on Berry, The Princeton Review praises the school for campus beauty, rigorous academics and sense of community and quotes extensively from Berry students the company surveyed.
 
Among their comments:
 
Undergrads at Berry are hardworking. Indeed, “nearly everyone works on campus” so students say the majority of their time “is spent either in class or at our jobs.” Nevertheless, this diligent bunch still manages to kick back and relax every now and again. For starters, many Berry undergrads are active and athletic. Therefore, a lot of people love to take advantage of the college’s “rock wall and rock wall room, zip lining, indoor and outdoor pool, basketball courts, volleyball courts [and] hiking [trails].” “Intramural sports are very popular,” as well. And students also “do a lot of outdoorsy things like camping and fishing deeper into campus and off campus.”
 
Fortunately, there are plenty of arts and culture options as well. For example, “the music department hosts a professional musician every Thursday.” And a student organization called KCAB “plans multiple events every week [including activities like] pajama movie night, African storytelling, [a] welcome back dance, prayer breakfast [and] MLK Service Day.” Finally, hometown Rome also offers a nice respite from academic stress. While it’s “definitely a small town...it’s [also] peaceful [and] fulfilling” with “a local theatre, a nice park, used bookstores [and] a nice selection of restaurants.”
 
The Princeton Review's ranking lists (www.princetonreview.com/best382) can be accessed for free with registration. The Princeton Review tallied the rankings for the 2019 edition based on its surveys of 138,000 students attending the 384 colleges.
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